Is a wave of sovereign defaults on the way?

The sovereign debtor that would win hands down a nomination as “most likely to fail” is surely Greece, which has just threatened to default on its next payment to the IMF. But Greece could be a distraction – history suggests sovereign default risk is rising elsewhere, and that a wave of such defaults could be on the way. Contemplate for a moment the following graph produced by Oxford Analytica, as part of the publicity materials for their new online tool that prices political risk. The graph tracks three indicators over time: oil prices, expropriations of foreign direct investment, and sovereign defaults. The relationship between oil prices and these two types of country risk is strikingly apparent. When oil prices rise, governments move to expropriate. High oil prices mean that natural resource investments are suddenly spectacularly profitable, and seizing these investments therefore becomes increasingly attractive. In the 2000’s, regimes from Kazakhstan to Chad to Russia to Bolivia indulged this temptation, and not only in oil – some mining investments, also with soaring profitability, were similarly nationalized. High oil prices also give cover to governments wishing to pursue extremely unorthodox economic policies. Venezuela, which seized not only oil but much foreign investment in the country, stands out as a recent example. On the graph, the link between oil prices and expropriation is obvious in the mid-1970s: expropriations peaked just after oil prices surged. The link is apparent again in the 2000’s, as a second surge in oil prices triggered another wave of expropriations, albeit with a less dramatic peak. The relationship between oil prices and sovereign defaults is precisely the opposite....